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About Digital Art / Hobbyist Official Beta Tester 刘雨Male/United States Recent Activity
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If you could have one super power, what would it be? 

31%
10 deviants said Teleportation (instantaneous, not subject to relativity)
16%
5 deviants said Flying (superman style)
16%
5 deviants said Telepathy (ability to read others' thoughts and communicate with them mentally)
13%
4 deviants said Invisibility (at will)
9%
3 deviants said Other (please comment) ^_^
6%
2 deviants said Ability to change the laws of physics (warning, may accidently destroy the universe, and yourself if used recklessly)
6%
2 deviants said Super strength (being able to punch through mountains, jump to the top of sky scrapers, etc...)
3%
1 deviant said Immortality (not aging or being able to die ever)

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airborne1982
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Dec 6, 2014
4:12 am

Activity


I am the fire, I am the flame,
you are the darkness, but we are the same.
When I look in your eyes I see myself.
Those memories aren’t things you can pull of a shelf.
A past that haunts you, burns you inside
and scars so deep that they’ve cut your pride.
But I chose the right path, and you chose wrong.
I kept charging forward when you said so-long.
Call it ambition or madness if you wish,
But nothing can stop me until I finish this.
This is my task and this is my time,
but I still wish you could be here to help me finish this rhyme.
Random poem
I had a couple rhymes I thought of that I wanted to write down, and I haven't submitted anything in a while so I thought I'd put it here.
It's not particularly good, but meh.... :XD:
Anyway, I wrote it like I am addressing it to somebody. I'm not. It just flowed better if I created an antagonist with whom the speaker had a complex relationship.

As for the task bit, that is reflective of me. I'm trying to get this Ph.D. and it's hard. Science is hard, experiments don't always work right, and if you're not sure why it just drives you crazy. Still, I do enjoy it (most of the time).
The hardest part about doing science is learning to forgive yourself when you make a mistake. That's because a single mistake will mess up anywhere between an hour and a month's worth of work.

If you're going to do science, you should have a role model like Glados. Glados makes mistakes, but Glados never gives up, and doesn't let mistakes upset her. She also carries out experiments in an organized manner and autoclaves/incinerates all contaminated material in an excellent display of responsible waste management.
That last part was a joke... 
In all seriousness though, I liked her best when she was a potato.
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Torture and Killings

Journal Entry: Fri Dec 12, 2014, 3:37 AM
Torture is bad. You shouldn't torture people. If you torture people, you're doing something awful, and you should be held accountable for it.

There, wasn't that simple?

Yes, I'm talking about the recently released report that the CIA (an organization who's sole purpose seems to be doing awful things under the delusion that they're necessary) tortured people between 2003 and 2007. I'm an American citizen, and I do not condone, never have condoned, and never will condone torture. What those individuals who carried out these "enhanced interrogation techniques" did was wrong, and the people who told them to do it were wrong. It is a stain on the honor of our nation that these acts happened, but all we can do now is to try to make sure they don't happen again.

Part of making sure that crimes don't happen again is accomplished by holding the perpetrators legally accountable. There is international outcry that this should be done, and I agree. If we don't prosecute the individuals involved, then how can we condemn other nations that are committing war crimes and human rights atrocities without being complete hypocrites? 

I want to discuss 2 societal issues in the US though. Yes, I acknowledge that the US, just like everyone else, has a lot of societal problems that it needs to address.

1. The defensiveness that the far-right has about the torture that occurred clearly demonstrates that they at least partially supported the practice. To this I say NO! It is very simple. Torture is cruel, unnecessary, and just wrong. You don't try to justify, or qualify something that is clearly wrong. To do so is idiotic at best, and pure evil at worst. Why the far-right in America has decided to become the pro-torture party is beyond my comprehension. Sure, most of the people who were subjected to it were doing pretty rotten things, but that doesn't mean there is any remote justification for stooping to their level.

2. Police shouldn't kill people unless it is absolutely necessary. Police are entrusted with great power in society, and they are essential to maintaining a functioning society, but if some police officers are abusing their authority things go very badly. Two cases of police killing black men in the US have recently brought more attention to a long-standing trend that shouldn't exist. African Americans are unduly targeted by law enforcement in the US, and they are not given the benefit of the doubt nearly as often as white people are. There are tens of thousands of cases out there where this has happened, and it needs to be fixed. I know there are a lot of good police officers who do their best to treat everyone fairly and genuinely want to make a positive difference in the world through their work. However, there are far too many officers who don't. The job attracts people who are bullies, and there is no more effective way for racists to bully people they look down on than by becoming cops. This is obviously a huge problem, and it's worse because we have very few ways of addressing it. At least 10% of police officers probably should not be police officers, and when people who aren't fit to be officers are given that responsibility, people die. Eric Garner and Michael are two examples of obviously excessive force resulting in needless deaths. Perhaps these individuals were breaking the law, but the laws they broke were minor, and they deserved to be treated with a level of civility that they were not granted before officers escalated the situations and ultimately killed them. I will not go around engaging in victim blaming. Those two men should not have been killed, and police officers should be held to a higher standard in exercising force than they are currently held to. 
Everybody makes mistakes, but a mistake in conduct shouldn't lead to a public execution on the spot. Nobody is perfect, and I understand that police officers don't have an easy time of their jobs either. To some extent this is an American problem, but I believe that it is much more of a problem in police culture. To the good cops out there, please, keep doing your jobs, we need you. To the cops who are unjustly or unequally enforcing laws, turn in your badges and find a new career. 

I am not so naive as to think that this problem can be solved at an individual level. The problem is that there is no trust between police officers and the communities that it's their job to protect. There is a lack of trust because there is only negative involvement of the two. Police officers in America don't stick around a community they are serving and get to know the people who live there. They can't, because they are always on the go, patrolling huge districts by car and getting shuffled around constantly. Therefore, they don't have any connections with the people they are arresting, and I think this is the biggest problem. If police had positive relationships with the communities they were serving, and had emotional attachments to the well-being of those communities, then the tone of policing would be completely different. As it is, policing is all about "fighting crime", and I think that focus has gotten in the way of healthy relationships with communities. If you spend all your time in a world where it is you (the good guys) and the criminals (the bad guys) and you have to stop them, and nothing else matters, then you don't think about the harm you do to communities when you hurt or kill somebody. Criminals are anyone who is currently breaking the law, that doesn't mean they are terrible people, it doesn't mean they deserve to die, it just means they are breaking a law. They deserve an appropriate punishment for breaking the law, but punishment should never be levied to harm, only to help. Sometimes the help is for the community at the expense of the individual, but I believe that the primary focus of criminal justice should be rehabilitation. We aren't very good at keeping that focus where it belongs. I think we are poorer as a society because too many things are viewed in binary. People are people, we all struggle through life together, and sometimes we make mistakes. Yet, it is clear there is malicious persecution of certain groups of people by some members of law enforcement, and I don't think we should put up with it. It's wrong, and it needs to be stopped. 

And there we have it, 2 things that are bad that I truly hope we can prevent from occurring in the future. 
I wish solving problems was as easy as figuring out some of the reasons why they exist.
I haven't join in on the "I can't breathe" protests, although I do support the cause. 
Maybe political action can help solve this problem, but unfortunately I fear that American democracy is dysfunctional, and all national dialog and legislation only serves the two major political parties instead of the people they claim to represent.
In that regard, I hope I'll be proven wrong.

Peace be with you, and have a wonderful day.
~
Universalkinase

  • Mood: Distressed

Memories

Journal Entry: Thu Dec 4, 2014, 12:38 AM
I've never been good at remembering the positive things in life.
I've focused far too much attention on every mistake I've ever made, every failure and every regret.
It's not a useful thing to do.

Thinking on mistakes briefly is important to avoid repeating them.
Thinking on them too much will lead you to avoid any situation where the previous outcome might possibly come to pass again.
The latter of those is just silly. We cannot know the future, and it is stifling to be terrified of things that we have little control over.

There is no mind so great that it cannot be overthrown by loss and fear.
Yet, we are each the architects of our own prisons, and our outlook on any situation governs a large percentage of our perceived reality.

I say the following more to myself than anyone else:
Do not lock all the doors around you just because they might have something bad behind them.
Life is not about playing it safe. Life is a fire that can engulf anything it touches. Sure, you can lock it up in a lantern and live life in a glass cage, but then you'll never know the beauty and exhilaration of running free and devouring every experience imaginable.
If all of us are flames, then we burn as hot, as bright, as big and as long as we chose to. Well, for the most part. The important thing is to believe that you have no limits, for then the prison you've built around yourself will cease to be.

Sometimes looking inward can feel like running through a forest of knives, but it doesn't have to be. Selective information filters are not an artificial construct, but rather an innate aspect of our biology. It is ironic that for all our technology and all our combined experience, we aren't really much better at seeing who we are than we ever were before.

Meh, I'm starting to ramble, so I'd better call the journal here.
Best wishes to you all this holiday season.

  • Mood: Content
  • Watching: Dr. Who
  • Playing: FTL

On Beliefs, Reality, and Societal Conflict

Journal Entry: Mon Oct 20, 2014, 12:05 AM

This is going to be a bit of rant. You’ve been warned. :XD:

 

So, I was recently asked by somebody I knew on social media what the phrase "true religion" meant to me. I thought about it for a while, and gave this reply.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Belief and truth are not compatible concepts. Truth can be approached by constantly refining a set of conclusions drawn from numerous and rigorous observations that rule out all alternatives. Beliefs do not follow the same sets of guidelines. We all be
lieve many things that may or may not be true. Obviously if we believe them, then we think they are true, but beliefs are conclusions that inherently lack sufficient empirical evidence to prove them.

Religions are sets of beliefs. Some of these beliefs may have more evidence to support them than others, but none of them can be positively identified as truth, because then they would cease to be beliefs and become facts.

I should emphasize that our beliefs are very important. They define us as individuals, and guide our interactions with the world. Yet we must remember that they are beliefs. Working in a framework of uncertainties is a requirement for peacefully interacting with others. If we always remember that there is a chance our beliefs may not actually be true, we might be able to live wiser and less destructive lives.

This is just my opinion on the matter."
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
That was my post, and I was rather pleased with it.
Of course, since it's the internet, somebody had to call me out by name and respond that no, I was wrong.
They weren't overtly offensive about it, but they did use one sentence that really bothers me.
They said: "Theological truth is eternal and infinite."
I can understand other parts of their argument, that all of our methods of establishing facts can sometimes be erroneous and misinterpreted, but I never said truth could be attained, only that it could be approached through the scientific method.
In any case, their rebuttal to my statement made me think of a number of other people I've encountered who have referred to their beliefs, or their religion as "truth". I once encountered an group of Christian extremists in a MMORPG who called their organization "The Truth" and they would spam the message board of the entire server with messages about their beliefs, and why you should embrace them. This really pissed me off, and here is why.

Stating that your own beliefs (that are mutually exclusive with other people's beliefs) are "the truth" is, through the process of exclusion, stating that other people's beliefs are false. Nobody likes to be told that the things they believe are wrong. This in itself is aggressive, and a bit offensive. However, I firmly believe that all of us should question ourselves, our thoughts, and our beliefs, so I am always willing to hear somebody out and consider whether they might be right, and I might be wrong. 

Here's the thing, you need evidence. If your entire argument is based upon other people’s opinions or assumptions without any hard evidence that you are right, and the other person is wrong, then you have no business trying to convince them of anything. Also, if you aren't willing to question your own beliefs, then what right do you have to try to force somebody else to question theirs?

I've had people tell me that [science is just another belief system, and is therefore isn’t any better a way of understanding anything than religion]. I’ve repeatedly had people tell me that truth can’t be grasped by our limited brains, so there is no point trying to figure it out, and that I should just accept the Bible as the final word on all of reality. I don’t respect a single person who has ever told me that.

Galileo himself quashed that argument hundreds of years ago because it’s a complete surrender to ignorance. The idea that “mankind can’t understand reality, so we shouldn’t try” stifles progress, and is just wrong. Look around you. Every technology we have is the result of the application of scientific understanding that we have gained by trying, and by not believing the people who said “oh, it’s useless.”

 

It’s easy to say “things are the way they are because some supernatural being says so”, but that line of thought produces no insight, no innovation, and doesn’t make anyone any wiser.

 

Yesterday I watched a debate between 2 American politicians. Both were white Christian men, and both were asked directly how they reconcile discrepancies between science and religion on issues like the age of the earth? Scientific evidence that (among other things) has examined the ratios of uranium and lead in asteroids and the earth has shown pretty conclusively that the Earth is 4.5 billion years old. This can be calculated because we know the rate at which uranium decays into lead. Some interpretations of Judeo-Christian creation myths hold that the age of the Earth is between 6,000 and 10,000 years. Here scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports the idea that the Earth is 750,000 times older than this creation myth asserts.

 

Neither candidate was willing to take a stand and say how old they thought the Earth was. One of the candidates did talk about how he thought it was important to act responsibly in response to scientific insight. The other candidate just talked about how important faith was to him and his family without providing any example or instance that the use of scientific information is ever useful in policy making.

 

This is a problem.

Our beliefs are important, give us strength, and deserve to be respected. However, when there is overwhelming evidence that one belief you hold is false, and you fail to at least question it, there is something wrong with you.

I don’t say this because I want to insult anyone, I say this because being able to cope with occasionally being wrong is a fundamental tenant of sanity.

There is a large population of people in my country who are actively against science. I don’t truly understand their point of view. Perhaps they feel that somehow their beliefs are under attack by people who are trying to objectively uncover the truth about how our world works, or perhaps they are just carrying on the long standing tradition of religious organizations of mercilessly persecuting any free thinking person.

Whatever their reasons, there is blood on their hands, then and now. I’m talking about people who refuse to vaccinate their children against deadly diseases and thereby put not only their children, but entire communities at risk. I’m talking about people who point-blank refuse to acknowledge that dumping billions of tons of CO2 into the atmosphere every year is affecting atmospheric chemistry, and that that might have some deleterious impacts on our world.

This is why I have little tolerance for anyone saying that the information recorded in a little book that some people wrote thousands of years ago is all that our species needs to know. The world has changed because of science and technology. Our global population is more than 20 times what it was in 1 AD due to medical innovations. Not a single bit of the surface of the earth is unaffected by our actions today, and together we know millions of times more about this world than any person living over a thousand years ago did.

 

We have a responsibility to think about our actions, and to try not to do things that hurt other people.
We have a responsibility to build a brighter future for our children, and the generations to come.
If we ignore these responsibilities, and recklessly sow destruction and suffering, then the world would be better off if we didn’t exist.
That is not something that I want said of me, and I hope that it’s not something you’d want said of you either.

Everybody has the right to believe what they want. Nobody should be discriminated against because of their beliefs. However, science is not just another belief system. It is the best understanding we have of this world. Science should of course be questioned, science is science because it is constantly questioned and doubted. The conclusions that come out of it aren’t always right, but they are far more rigorous and objective than conclusions written down in ancient books, and they are the best thing that we have.

 

When individuals, and particularly politicians, turn their backs on science, they are turning their backs on reality. When world leaders turn their backs on reality, we have a problem.

 

Yes, we have many societal problems, and few have easy solutions.

 

A good leader does what is just, what is wise, and what is right for the future. In democracies, most “leaders” just try to do what is popular. Appealing to greed and paranoia are almost always useful in gaining popularity, and because of that, almost all of our national and global political systems are very good at mortgaging the future for the sake of the present.

 

We have to change this. I feel sad that I don't know how to bring about that change.

Unfortunately, nobody else seems to know how to either.



  • Mood: Rant
  • Listening to: Trance

Memories

Journal Entry: Thu Dec 4, 2014, 12:38 AM
I've never been good at remembering the positive things in life.
I've focused far too much attention on every mistake I've ever made, every failure and every regret.
It's not a useful thing to do.

Thinking on mistakes briefly is important to avoid repeating them.
Thinking on them too much will lead you to avoid any situation where the previous outcome might possibly come to pass again.
The latter of those is just silly. We cannot know the future, and it is stifling to be terrified of things that we have little control over.

There is no mind so great that it cannot be overthrown by loss and fear.
Yet, we are each the architects of our own prisons, and our outlook on any situation governs a large percentage of our perceived reality.

I say the following more to myself than anyone else:
Do not lock all the doors around you just because they might have something bad behind them.
Life is not about playing it safe. Life is a fire that can engulf anything it touches. Sure, you can lock it up in a lantern and live life in a glass cage, but then you'll never know the beauty and exhilaration of running free and devouring every experience imaginable.
If all of us are flames, then we burn as hot, as bright, as big and as long as we chose to. Well, for the most part. The important thing is to believe that you have no limits, for then the prison you've built around yourself will cease to be.

Sometimes looking inward can feel like running through a forest of knives, but it doesn't have to be. Selective information filters are not an artificial construct, but rather an innate aspect of our biology. It is ironic that for all our technology and all our combined experience, we aren't really much better at seeing who we are than we ever were before.

Meh, I'm starting to ramble, so I'd better call the journal here.
Best wishes to you all this holiday season.

  • Mood: Content
  • Watching: Dr. Who
  • Playing: FTL

deviantID

UniversalKinase
刘雨
Artist | Hobbyist | Digital Art
United States
As a 23-year old Ph.D. student, there are many things in this world that I have yet to learn. I tend to take tasks very seriously, and the creation of art is important to me.

I began making fractal art back in 2006, shortly after I joined DA. Since that time, I have competed in a number of fractal contests and won several. My techniques vary significantly from some that you see among other fractal artists. I have remained on the outskirts of the community, which has in some ways stunted my growth as an artist, but simultaneously challenged me to develop my own techniques and gain a better understanding of the underlying mathematical principals that govern fractals. However, I have learned that it doesn't matter how much time you spend on techniques if you don't put your soul into the art you're making. It doesn't matter what median it is, without passion all you get is a hollow image, devoid of feeling.

While most of my art consists of fractals, I love to write, and I value my prose and poetry just as highly as my best fractals.

I am always eager to help people out, so if you have any questions about how I make my art, or if you would like me to make something for you, feel free to ask. B-)

Personal Quote: "If the door is locked, become the key"
Interests

Critiques

Paradisia falls by bib993
by bib993

When I first saw the thumbnail for this in the fractals category, I thought to myself "this has to be a mistake." Upon clicking the lin...

The deep is mine by sanguisGelidus

I could say that this piece is stunning, but that doesn't really seem adequate for an artistic work of this caliper. The color scheme i...

Groups

Art

Art is the ultimate expression of the mind and soul. Within all of us lies the omnipresent potential to find peace, agony, joy and ire in all walks of life. How we choose to percieve situations is what defines us as individuals, and how we react is the ultimate test of our character.

The community on DeviantArt is truly incredible because of the amazing people who devote vast amounts of time energy to make it so. Always remember to be respectful towards others and their art, for a stray callous word against something of extreme individual importance can cause far more torment than intended.

Comments


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:iconfunkstoerung:
funkstoerung Featured By Owner Nov 21, 2014  Student
thank you so much for the fav! (:
Reply
:iconjakeukalane:
Jakeukalane Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Happy birthday! :)
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:iconuniversalkinase:
UniversalKinase Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you so much! ^_^
Reply
:iconjakeukalane:
Jakeukalane Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
u r welcome :D
Reply
:iconkayandjay100:
kayandjay100 Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:party: Happy birthday ~ I hope you have a really great day! :iconballoonsplz::iconwineplz::iconflowerheartplz: Cheers, Coco
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